Ennerdale  Lordship Former Crown Manor - Feudal Barony of Copeland in Cumbria
© Former Crown Manor of Ennerdale - 2020-22

More about Cumbria - Copeland and Ennerdale

Ancient Feudal Lordship and former “Crown Manor” of Ennerdale

Around 1120, Henry I gave the Barony of Copeland in Cumberland including the Caput of Ennerdale to Ranulph le Meschines, and in 1227 the Fief of Cumberland became part of the Kingdom. The Manor of Ennerdale (Part of Ancient Feudal Copeland) lies in one of the wildest and beautiful parts of the Lake District. It includes, in its roughly 13,000 acres, the glacial lake, mountains, rivers, forests, adn Ennerdale Water, the most western of the lakes. Ennerdale Valley lies 8 miles from the coast and is surrounded by several fells including Great Borne (2019 ft), Great Gable (2949 ft) and Pillar Mountain (2927 ft). Ennerdale (Alnanderdale or Eynerdale) sallis ad Eyn, both the town and parish now called by the inhabitants. The Irish named it Lough-Eanheh Lacus volucrum, of the fowls that bred there in the islands; and the river Oonh-Eanheh and the dale Eanor or Ar-ean. The Saxons still retaining the Irish name called the bottom and valley Enerdale. At the time of the Domesday Book (1086 CE) Ennerdale-Copeland & Cumberland was part of Scotland, although some villages around Millom, which were the possessions of the Earl of Northumbria, had been incorporated into Yorkshire. Ennerdale is now part of Copeland district and is the last Scottish Lordship Territory and Moeity attributable to the original Barony of Copeland. On the death of King Henry I of England in 1135, the Ennerdale Lordship and Copeland Barony was regained by King David I of Scotland. The area returned to the English crown in 1157, when Henry II of England took possession of the area (from Malcolm IV of Scotland). The Grant King Henry I, also known as Henry Beauclerc, was King of England from 1100 to his death in 1135 and created the Barony of Copeland in Cumbria. The Cumberland region was part of both Scottish territory or English territory for centuries. The border between England and Scotland was made permanent by the Treaty of York in 1237. William Meschin was the 1st Norman Lord of Copeland. Ennerdale was part of the Free Chase of Egremont generally called the "Forest of Copeland" or Forestum de Coupland. At the partition of Copeland in 1338, the Bermingham Heiress recieved the Lordship of Ennerdale or Eynerdale which is a massive 16-20 thousand acres of Cumbria. Copeland Forest Barony, partitioned 1338 between Harrington or Bermingham (2a Ennerdale), Fitzwalter (2b - Middleward) and Lucy (2c - Eskdaleward) heiresses of The Barony of Egremont (Egremont is the name of the castle/barony after the baron chose to change/create a new name for the barony. (Cal. Close Rolls, 1338, pp. 495,477,487). This means that the 1338 moeity of Ennerdale included part of the Barony of Copeland or Egremont. Further, Copeland held the monastic possessions of St. Bees Priory which implicates that the owners of of the Barony of Copeland Egremont may have also been Barons of the Isle of Man or "Barons of the Isle". A portion of Ennerdale, was given by Ranulph, son of William de Meschines, to the priory of St. Bees; the other portion of Ancient Copeland/ Eynerdale passed hands in the division of the Barony of Copland to the Harringtons of Harrington, from them came by successive heiresses to the Boyvilles and Greys, and was ultimately forfeited to the Crown, in 1554, by the attainder of Henry Duke of Suffolk. The whole of the Manor was held by the Crown from 1554-1821 and all of the manorial and baronial rights to over 16,000 acres of mines, forests, and glacial lakes were purchased by the Earl of Lonsdale in 1821.

Lakes and Mountains of Ennerdale

Ennerdale Water is the most westerly lake in the Lake District National Park in Cumbria, England. It is a glacial lake, with a maximum depth of 150 feet, and is ½ mile to a mile wide and 2½ miles long.

Ennerdale Nature

Lying on the north western edge of the Lake District National Park, Ennerdale is home to some of England’s most vibrant natural environments and one of the longest running wild land restoration projects in the UK

Ennerdale Bridge - Year 1750 - Artist: [Wilkinson,

Jonathon] - British Library

View of Ennerdale Bridge and Chapel in Cumbria, Northern England. The Village of Ennerdale is situated on Ennerdale Lake with the River Ehen flowing nearby from which the local names are derived. A chapel has stood on this site on the banks of the river since 1534. The chapel was rebuilt in 1857 through subscription and became St Mary’s Church. Worsworth wrote of the chapel in a sonnet, “In our churchyard Is neither epitaph nor monument, Tombstone nor name- only the turf we tread And a few natural graves”

Celtic Kingdom of Cumbria and Rheged

After the Roman Empire departed from Britain, and before the invasion of “England” by the invading Anglo-Saxon tribes, various Celtic kingdoms were powerful. In northern England and southern Scotland there was the: Strathclyde Kingdom (southwestern Scotland), Goddodin (southeastern Scotland), and Elmet (west Yorkshire). Overall, the most powerful and famous ancient kingdome between England and Scotland was Cumbria (also called Rheged (410-600AD) ), located in the northwest region of England accross from Ireland, roughly equivalent to the modern English county of Cumbria.

Celtic Kingdom of Northumbria and Ennerdale

The Angles: Northumbrian takeover and rule, (600–875AD -) The rise of the church, and the parallel decline in fortune of the secular royal power, meant that Northumbria and its Cumbrian appendage were not strong enough militarily to fend off the next set of raiders and settlers (who first attacked the Lindisfarne monastery in 793) – the Vikings. By 875, the Northumbrian kingdom had been taken over by Danish Vikings. Cumbria was to go through a period of Irish- Scandinavian (Norse) settlement with the addition, from the late 9th century on, of the influx of more Brittonic Celts. Vikings, Strathclyde British, Scots, English and 'Cumbria', 875–1066 From c. 941, it has been suggested, Cumbrian/Scottish rule may have lasted around 115 years Most of modern-day Cumbria was a principality in the Kingdom of Scotland at the time of the Norman conquest of England in 1066 and thus was excluded from the Domesday Book survey of 1086. Map below 700AD
Ennerdale-Copeland Lordship or Barony The Barony of Egremont (Feudal Barony of Copeland), sometimes known as Allerdale above Derwent, covered west Cumberland between the rivers Derwent and Duddon (though Millom lordship or seigniory was to all intents and purposes a separate unit of superior jurisdiction, so that the southern boundary of Egremont Lordship was effectively the River Esk). The barony was partitioned in 1338, after the death of John de Multon, the last baron of Egremont, two-thirds of the barony descending by the mid-16th century to the Percys, earls of Northumberland. The Percy’s estates were administered from Cockermouth Castle. For some aspects of estate administration the barony was divided into two bailiwicks, that ‘between Ehen and Derwent’ covering the northern section; that ‘between Ehen and Duddon’ the southern. The lowland parts of the barony, outside Copeland Forest, fell under the jurisdiction of Egremont Lordship court, to which ‘turnsmen’ from each township were obliged to go. Townships sending turnsmen to the court were: Egremont, Lowside Quarter, St John and St Bridget Beckermet, Cleator, Muncaster, Drigg, Irton, Bolton, Gosforth, Haile, Newton, Workington, Lamplugh, Murton (with Mosser, Whillimoor, Weddicar and Moresby), Kelton, Frizington, Distington, Wilton and Braystones, Calder and Beckermet. Copeland Forest The upland section of the barony of Copeland or Egremont, covering the western valleys of the Lake District. The manor of Loweswater was probably part of the forest before it was separated from the rest of the barony in 1230. The remainder of the forest was partitioned into three parts in 1338 after the death of John de Multon: The 13,000 acres of Ennerdale Land, Lakes and Forest (which was never reunited with the rest of the barony and was forfeited to the Crown in 1554); the ‘Middleward’ (the townships of Kinniside and Netherwasdale and the empty extra-parochial pasture of Stockdale moor), which descended to the Fitzwalter family and was sold by the Earl of Sussex to the Crown in 1539 and was thus reunited with the Percy share, which was then back in Crown hands. Also, Eskdale, Miterdale and Wasdalehead, which went to the ancestors of the Percies. Copeland forest does not appear as an entity in the MDR as it did not have the status of a single lordship or manor; records are entered under the name of the constituent manors. See also outline of Percy estates.
England 878AD from Wiki Commons
© Former Crown Manor of Ennerdale Former Barony of Copeland

More about Cumbria - Copeland

and Ennerdale

Ancient Feudal Lordship and

former “Crown Manor” of

Ennerdale

Around 1120, Henry I gave the Barony of Copeland in Cumberland including the Caput of Ennerdale to Ranulph le Meschines, and in 1227 the Fief of Cumberland became part of the Kingdom. The Manor of Ennerdale (Part of Ancient Feudal Copeland) lies in one of the wildest and beautiful parts of the Lake District. It includes, in its roughly 13,000 acres, the glacial lake, mountains, rivers, forests, adn Ennerdale Water, the most western of the lakes. Ennerdale Valley lies 8 miles from the coast and is surrounded by several fells including Great Borne (2019 ft), Great Gable (2949 ft) and Pillar Mountain (2927 ft). Ennerdale (Alnanderdale or Eynerdale) sallis ad Eyn, both the town and parish now called by the inhabitants. The Irish named it Lough-Eanheh Lacus volucrum, of the fowls that bred there in the islands; and the river Oonh- Eanheh and the dale Eanor or Ar-ean. The Saxons still retaining the Irish name called the bottom and valley Enerdale. At the time of the Domesday Book (1086 CE) Ennerdale-Copeland & Cumberland was part of Scotland, although some villages around Millom, which were the possessions of the Earl of Northumbria, had been incorporated into Yorkshire. Ennerdale is now part of Copeland district and is the last Scottish Lordship Territory and Moeity attributable to the original Barony of Copeland. On the death of King Henry I of England in 1135, the Ennerdale Lordship and Copeland Barony was regained by King David I of Scotland. The area returned to the English crown in 1157, when Henry II of England took possession of the area (from Malcolm IV of Scotland). The Grant King Henry I, also known as Henry Beauclerc, was King of England from 1100 to his death in 1135 and created the Barony of Copeland in Cumbria. The Cumberland region was part of both Scottish territory or English territory for centuries. The border between England and Scotland was made permanent by the Treaty of York in 1237. William Meschin was the 1st Norman Lord of Copeland. Ennerdale was part of the Free Chase of Egremont generally called the "Forest of Copeland" or Forestum de Coupland. At the partition of Copeland in 1338, the Bermingham Heiress recieved the Lordship of Ennerdale or Eynerdale which is a massive 16-20 thousand acres of Cumbria. Copeland Forest Barony, partitioned 1338 between Harrington or Bermingham (2a Ennerdale), Fitzwalter (2b - Middleward) and Lucy (2c - Eskdaleward) heiresses of The Barony of Egremont (Egremont is the name of the castle/barony after the baron chose to change/create a new name for the barony. (Cal. Close Rolls, 1338, pp. 495,477,487). This means that the 1338 moeity of Ennerdale included part of the Barony of Copeland or Egremont. Further, Copeland held the monastic possessions of St. Bees Priory which implicates that the owners of of the Barony of Copeland Egremont may have also been Barons of the Isle of Man or "Barons of the Isle". A portion of Ennerdale, was given by Ranulph, son of William de Meschines, to the priory of St. Bees; the other portion of Ancient Copeland/ Eynerdale passed hands in the division of the Barony of Copland to the Harringtons of Harrington, from them came by successive heiresses to the Boyvilles and Greys, and was ultimately forfeited to the Crown, in 1554, by the attainder of Henry Duke of Suffolk. The whole of the Manor was held by the Crown from 1554-1821 and all of the manorial and baronial rights to over 16,000 acres of mines, forests, and glacial lakes were purchased by the Earl of Lonsdale in 1821.

Lakes and Mountains of Ennerdale

Ennerdale Water is the most westerly lake in the Lake District National Park in Cumbria, England. It is a glacial lake, with a maximum depth of 150 feet, and is ½ mile to a mile wide and 2½ miles long.

Ennerdale Nature

Lying on the north western edge of the Lake District National Park, Ennerdale is home to some of England’s most vibrant natural environments and one of the longest running wild land restoration projects in the UK

Ennerdale Bridge - Year 1750 - Artist:

[Wilkinson, Jonathon] - British Library

View of Ennerdale Bridge and Chapel in Cumbria, Northern England. The Village of Ennerdale is situated on Ennerdale Lake with the River Ehen flowing nearby from which the local names are derived. A chapel has stood on this site on the banks of the river since 1534. The chapel was rebuilt in 1857 through subscription and became St Mary’s Church. Worsworth wrote of the chapel in a sonnet, “In our churchyard Is neither epitaph nor monument, Tombstone nor name- only the turf we tread And a few natural graves”

Celtic Kingdom of Cumbria and Rheged

After the Roman Empire departed from Britain, and before the invasion of “England” by the invading Anglo-Saxon tribes, various Celtic kingdoms were powerful. In northern England and southern Scotland there was the: Strathclyde Kingdom (southwestern Scotland), Goddodin (southeastern Scotland), and Elmet (west Yorkshire). Overall, the most powerful and famous ancient kingdome between England and Scotland was Cumbria (also called Rheged (410-600AD) ), located in the northwest region of England accross from Ireland, roughly equivalent to the modern English county of Cumbria.

Celtic Kingdom of Northumbria and

Ennerdale

The Angles: Northumbrian takeover and rule, (600–875AD -) The rise of the church, and the parallel decline in fortune of the secular royal power, meant that Northumbria and its Cumbrian appendage were not strong enough militarily to fend off the next set of raiders and settlers (who first attacked the Lindisfarne monastery in 793) – the Vikings. By 875, the Northumbrian kingdom had been taken over by Danish Vikings. Cumbria was to go through a period of Irish-Scandinavian (Norse) settlement with the addition, from the late 9th century on, of the influx of more Brittonic Celts. Vikings, Strathclyde British, Scots, English and 'Cumbria', 875–1066 From c. 941, it has been suggested, Cumbrian/Scottish rule may have lasted around 115 years Most of modern-day Cumbria was a principality in the Kingdom of Scotland at the time of the Norman conquest of England in 1066 and thus was excluded from the Domesday Book survey of 1086. Map below 700AD
Map 800s below
Ennerdale's St Mary's church was founded in 1534 as a chapel of the abbey of St Bees. Wordsworth wrote in his poem The Brothers of the homely priest of Ennerdale, as he and his wife sat spinning 'upon the long seat beneath the eaves of the old cottage'. The church which he saw was replaced in 1857 by the present Romanesque building, which stands with simple dignity in the old churchyard.